Camp 6, mobile force feeding chair

"In 2005 I first saw the affidavits from prisoners alleging mistreatment by the medical staff and the deliberate use of over-size tubes to force them off their hunger strikes. I was, however, much more interested in the affidavit of Dr Edmondson, the doctor in charge of the hospital in Guantanamo refuting the allegations and stating that he had permission to force-feed the prisoners as he was following the orders of a “higher military authority”. These words exactly mirrored those used by the Nazi doctors charged with war crimes at Nuremberg."

Dr David Nicholl

roarslionfiles:

“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No I’m not going 10,000 miles from home to help murder and burn another poor nation simply to continue the domination of white slave masters over darker people in the world. This is the day when such evils must come to an end. I have been warned that to take such a stand would cost me millions of dollars. But I have said it once and I will say it again. The real enemy of my people is here. I will not disgrace my religion, my people or myself by becoming a tool to enslave those who are fighting for their own justice, freedom and equality. If I thought the war was going to bring freedom and equality to 22 million of my people they wouldn’t have to draft me, I’d join tomorrow. I have nothing to lose by standing up for my beliefs. So I’ll go to jail, so what? We’ve been in jail for 400 years.” - 1967

roarslionfiles:

“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No I’m not going 10,000 miles from home to help murder and burn another poor nation simply to continue the domination of white slave masters over darker people in the world. This is the day when such evils must come to an end. I have been warned that to take such a stand would cost me millions of dollars. But I have said it once and I will say it again. The real enemy of my people is here. I will not disgrace my religion, my people or myself by becoming a tool to enslave those who are fighting for their own justice, freedom and equality. If I thought the war was going to bring freedom and equality to 22 million of my people they wouldn’t have to draft me, I’d join tomorrow. I have nothing to lose by standing up for my beliefs. So I’ll go to jail, so what? We’ve been in jail for 400 years.” - 1967

brianafahey:

‘We send these kids off to war — we make them see things people otherwise wouldn’t have to see. Then we expect them to come back and behave like the rest of us. It’s breaking my heart.’ (via Heartbreaking Photos Of A Troubled Iraq War Veteran Win Pulitzer Prize)
brianafahey:

‘We send these kids off to war — we make them see things people otherwise wouldn’t have to see. Then we expect them to come back and behave like the rest of us. It’s breaking my heart.’ (via Heartbreaking Photos Of A Troubled Iraq War Veteran Win Pulitzer Prize)

brianafahey:

‘We send these kids off to war — we make them see things people otherwise wouldn’t have to see. Then we expect them to come back and behave like the rest of us. It’s breaking my heart.’ (via Heartbreaking Photos Of A Troubled Iraq War Veteran Win Pulitzer Prize)

Explosion (1917) by George Grosz

Grosz’s image of a burning, shattered Berlin is an allegory of destruction created shortly after he was discharged from the German army as “permanently unfit.”

"In Africa no man is allowed to be vulnerable," says RLP’s gender officer Salome Atim. "You have to be masculine, strong. You should never break down or cry. A man must be a leader and provide for the whole family. When he fails to reach that set standard, society perceives that there is something wrong."

Often, she says, wives who discover their husbands have been raped decide to leave them. “They ask me: ‘So now how am I going to live with him? As what? Is this still a husband? Is it a wife?’ They ask, ‘If he can be raped, who is protecting me?’ There’s one family I have been working closely with in which the husband has been raped twice. When his wife discovered this, she went home, packed her belongings, picked up their child and left. Of course that brought down this man’s heart.”

Back at RLP I’m told about the other ways in which their clients have been made to suffer. Men aren’t simply raped, they are forced to penetrate holes in banana trees that run with acidic sap, to sit with their genitals over a fire, to drag rocks tied to their penis, to give oral sex to queues of soldiers, to be penetrated with screwdrivers and sticks. Atim has now seen so many male survivors that, frequently, she can spot them the moment they sit down. “They tend to lean forward and will often sit on one buttock,” she tells me. “When they cough, they grab their lower regions. At times, they will stand up and there’s blood on the chair. And they often have some kind of smell.”

[…]

"International human rights law leaves out men in nearly all instruments designed to address sexual violence," she continues. "The UN Security Council Resolution 1325 in 2000 treats wartime sexual violence as something that only impacts on women and girls… Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently announced $44m to implement this resolution. Because of its entirely exclusive focus on female victims, it seems unlikely that any of these new funds will reach the thousands of men and boys who suffer from this kind of abuse. Ignoring male rape not only neglects men, it also harms women by reinforcing a viewpoint that equates ‘female’ with ‘victim’, thus hampering our ability to see women as strong and empowered. In the same way, silence about male victims reinforces unhealthy expectations about men and their supposed invulnerability.”

Considering Dolan’s finding that “female rape is significantly underreported and male rape almost never”, I ask Stemple if, following her research, she believes it might be a hitherto unimagined part of all wars. “No one knows, but I do think it’s safe to say that it’s likely that it’s been a part of many wars throughout history and that taboo has played a part in the silence.”

As I leave Uganda, there’s a detail of a story that I can’t forget. Before receiving help from the RLP, one man went to see his local doctor. He told him he had been raped four times, that he was injured and depressed and his wife had threatened to leave him. The doctor gave him a Panadol.

“For every soldier killed on the battlefield this year, about 25 veterans are dying by their own hands. An American soldier dies every day and a half, on average, in Iraq or Afghanistan. Veterans kill themselves at a rate of one every 80 minutes.”

jahanzebjz:

CD:So do you think that this American strategy of flexing its muscles, troop surge and the desire to negotiate from a position of strength is a wrong strategy?

ZH: Yes. This strategy is getting the United States more and more into a quagmire.

CD: Is this the reason why the insurgency is not abating and the Taliban are getting stronger and stronger?

ZH: Yes, this is one of the major reasons. Recently the Americans claimed that the night raids have worked and it has allowed them to eliminate a large number of mid-level insurgent commanders, but the constant rise of Taliban attacks show that this strategy, too, has not been affective.

Another thing is that the major problem for the Americans now is the widening gap between the NATO forces and the Afghans counterparts. This is a much greater issue for the US at this point of time because this brings into question the US strategy of building up an Afghan army which can take over from the Americans the responsibility of providing security once NATO leaves.

CD:So the Afghan army that the US is trying to build is not ready to take up that responsibility once the US eventually leaves?

ZH: That is the thing – the Afghan army is not ready. There is so much resentment and animosity between the two that obviously this could not work.

CD: What is likely to happen when the US leaves Afghanistan? Will there be a civil war? Will the insurgents go face to face with the Afghan army that the US is trying to build?

ZH: There is certainly a much greater probability of Afghanistan returning to a civil war if there is no negotiated settlement before the Americans leave the country. There is also a fear that, if a bloody civil war breaks out, the Afghan national army could disintegrate.

CD:Are the Americans aware of this possibility? Do they have the will to prevent such a scenario?

ZH: The only way the US can prevent a civil war is by reaching some sort of a negotiated settlement with the Taliban; allow them to become a part of the transition government, etc. But if this does not happen, and there is no sign of this happening, then the best chance of avoiding a civil war is gone.

Half of America doesn’t even know why we’re in Afghanistan, but the answer isn’t Ron-Paul-esque: withdrawing now is not a choice.

U.S. sees lifetime cost of F-35 fighter at $1.45 trillion

jahanzebjz:

There is no austerity or spending limit when you wanna rule the world by force. Austerity and other such things are only for those who have to be ruled over.

(via jahanzebjz)

“They turn war into porn. Soldiers and Marines, especially those who have never seen war, buy cases of beer and watch movies like Platoon, movies meant to denounce war, and as they do, they revel in the destructive power of weaponry. The reality of violence is different. Everything formed by violence is senseless and useless. It exists without a future. It leaves behind nothing but death, grief, and destruction.”
Chris Hedges (via azspot)

(via azspot)

In the days following the rogue US soldier’s shooting spree in Kandahar, most of the media, us included, focused on the “backlash” and how it might further strain the relations with the US.

Many mainstream media outlets channelled a significant amount of  energy into uncovering the slightest detail about the accused soldier – now identified as Staff Sergeant Robert Bales. We even know where his wife wanted to go for vacation, or what she said on her personal blog.

But the victims became a footnote, an anonymous footnote. Just the number 16. No one bothered to ask their ages, their hobbies, their aspirations. Worst of all, no one bothered to ask their names.

In honoring their memory, I write their names below, and the little we know about them: that nine of them were children, three were women.

The dead:
Mohamed Dawood son of  Abdullah
Khudaydad son of Mohamed Juma
Nazar Mohamed 
Payendo
Robeena
Shatarina daughter of Sultan Mohamed
Zahra daughter of Abdul Hamid
Nazia daughter of Dost Mohamed
Masooma daughter of Mohamed Wazir 
Farida daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Palwasha daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Nabia daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Esmatullah daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Faizullah son of Mohamed Wazir
Essa Mohamed son of Mohamed Hussain
Akhtar Mohamed son of Murrad Ali 
 
The wounded:
Haji Mohamed Naim son of Haji Sakhawat
Mohamed Sediq son of Mohamed Naim
Parween
Rafiullah
Zardana
Zulheja

(via mohandasgandhi)

Women’s rights activists in Morocco have demonstrated outside the parliament building in Rabat, to demand a change in the law on underage rape.

It follows the suicide of a 16 year old girl, who was forced to marry the man she claimed had raped her.

“This is not just for Moroccan women. It’s for women who are raped, beaten and killed throughout the world.”

(via mohandasgandhi)

watanafghanistan:

Very sad, the fact that we Afghans are unable to get justice from our murderers. They are protected, their murders covered up and absurdly justified by the US government. Any crimes committed by the US soldiers are ignored and covered up while those fighting to defend their country their homes and their families are labeled terrorists and are either killed instantly or locked up for years.

You will see, At first few times the Afghans accepted apologies when civilians were killed, but then when it got too much, the afghans protested and no more apologies were accepted and sooner or later a time will come when the afghans will realize that even the demonstrations and protests wont do anything, it wont bring them justice. So they will start to take justice into their own hands. Instead of the Taliban only, every afghan will carry a gun and shoot any US or NATO soldiers at sight, because they will be fed up with the system, fed up with no justice fed up with losing families and children.

Spc. Jeremy Morlock admitted to the murder of unarmed Afghan boy Gul Mudin (depicted here). He was only 15 years old. They lined him against a wall and ordered him to stand still before they shot him. Pfc. Andrew Holmes cut off his pinky as a memento. Morlock admitted that this wasn’t the first time he murdered civilians. According to him, soldiers in his Platoon “[threw] candy out of a Stryker vehicle as they drove through a village [and shot] children who came running to pick up the sweets.” The Pentagon worked for months to get these pictures deleted and suppressed. He was recently sentenced to 24 years in prison.

Private Bradley Manning, horrified at the war crimes unfolding around him, reported them to higher authorities in his chain of command. When they told him to keep quiet about it he published the details of the crimes to the public.

(via watanafghanistan)

thepoliticalnotebook:

“As I’m talking to you now, they’re dying.” Injured Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy gives Sky News an interview from his hospital bed. This is a really important interview. His descriptions of what’s happening in Homs are painful and terrible. He spoke of the scheduled regularity of the shelling, beginning with horrible predictability at 6:00 every morning.

I’ve worked in many war zones. I’ve never seen, or been, in shelling like this. It is a systematic … I’m an ex-artillery gunner so I can kind of follow the patterns… they’re systematically moving through neighborhoods with munitions that are used for battlefields. This is used in a couple of square kilometers. 

He described the state of fear in Homs, calling it “beyond shell shock,” and the actions of Assad’s forces “absolutely indiscriminate,” with the intensity of the bombardments increasing daily. Conroy’s detailing of the inhumane conditions and the position of the Syrian citizens and the Free Syrian Army is important, because we don’t have as many journalists who have been able to tell us what it was like to be there as we have had elsewhere. He tells us that “The time for talking is actually over. Now, the massacre and the killing is at full tilt.” 

I actually want to quote his entire interview about the people who are living without hope, food, or power and his conviction that we will look back on this massacre with incredible shame if we stand by and do nothing. In lieu of that, you must must must watch every bit of this interview.

"Forget geopolitics," "do something."

(via thepoliticalnotebook)