tristanpej:

Man watches his wife and child leave as he’s awaiting deportation.

jahanzebjz:

CD:So do you think that this American strategy of flexing its muscles, troop surge and the desire to negotiate from a position of strength is a wrong strategy?

ZH: Yes. This strategy is getting the United States more and more into a quagmire.

CD: Is this the reason why the insurgency is not abating and the Taliban are getting stronger and stronger?

ZH: Yes, this is one of the major reasons. Recently the Americans claimed that the night raids have worked and it has allowed them to eliminate a large number of mid-level insurgent commanders, but the constant rise of Taliban attacks show that this strategy, too, has not been affective.

Another thing is that the major problem for the Americans now is the widening gap between the NATO forces and the Afghans counterparts. This is a much greater issue for the US at this point of time because this brings into question the US strategy of building up an Afghan army which can take over from the Americans the responsibility of providing security once NATO leaves.

CD:So the Afghan army that the US is trying to build is not ready to take up that responsibility once the US eventually leaves?

ZH: That is the thing – the Afghan army is not ready. There is so much resentment and animosity between the two that obviously this could not work.

CD: What is likely to happen when the US leaves Afghanistan? Will there be a civil war? Will the insurgents go face to face with the Afghan army that the US is trying to build?

ZH: There is certainly a much greater probability of Afghanistan returning to a civil war if there is no negotiated settlement before the Americans leave the country. There is also a fear that, if a bloody civil war breaks out, the Afghan national army could disintegrate.

CD:Are the Americans aware of this possibility? Do they have the will to prevent such a scenario?

ZH: The only way the US can prevent a civil war is by reaching some sort of a negotiated settlement with the Taliban; allow them to become a part of the transition government, etc. But if this does not happen, and there is no sign of this happening, then the best chance of avoiding a civil war is gone.

Half of America doesn’t even know why we’re in Afghanistan, but the answer isn’t Ron-Paul-esque: withdrawing now is not a choice.
jahanzebjz:

A map of American military bases in the region that surrounds Iran. Leaving aside the illegality of American presence in the region, let’s not be surprised that Iran wants to defend itself and probably is building a nuclear weapon to deter the US. One can imagine how the US will react if China had hundreds of bases in Canada and Mexico. Oh, wait, you won’t be able to imagine such a scenario because: 1) such a possibility is so many light years away that only an extremely brainwashed Westerner can think of it. 2) If such a scenario even remotely became possible, the US will nuke the entire planet in a blink of any eye, thus giving you no time to even think about such a possibility.

jahanzebjz:

A map of American military bases in the region that surrounds Iran. Leaving aside the illegality of American presence in the region, let’s not be surprised that Iran wants to defend itself and probably is building a nuclear weapon to deter the US. One can imagine how the US will react if China had hundreds of bases in Canada and Mexico. Oh, wait, you won’t be able to imagine such a scenario because: 1) such a possibility is so many light years away that only an extremely brainwashed Westerner can think of it. 2) If such a scenario even remotely became possible, the US will nuke the entire planet in a blink of any eye, thus giving you no time to even think about such a possibility.

'Deadliest Day' in Afghanistan? Not by a Long Shot

waristerrorism:

08/09/2011 by Jim Naureckas

August 6, 2011, when 38 soldiers, including 30 U.S. troops, were killed when their helicopter was shot down, was the “deadliest day” of the Afghan War, several media outlets told us:

  • David Muir (ABC World News Saturday, 8/6/11): “It was the deadliest day of the war in Afghanistan, 30 Americans, 22 Navy SEALs lost.”
  • David Gregory (NBC Meet the Press8/7/11): “This was the single deadliest day of the war.”
  • Chicago Tribune headline (8/7/11): “Taliban Says It Downed Copter in Deadliest Day of War inAfghanistan”
  • ABC This Week graphic (8/7/11): “DEADLIEST DAY IN AFGHANISTAN”
  • Terrell Brown, CBS Morning News (8/8/11): “America mourns the loss of 30 warriors killed in Afghanistanon the war’s deadliest day.”
  • AP (8/9/11): “Troops killed in the deadliest day of the Afghan War are coming home today.”

But, of course, it wasn’t the war’s deadliest day—that unhappy distinction goes to May 4, 2009, when the U.S. military attacked the village of Granai, killing 140 people, 93 of them children, according to an Afghan government investigation (Reuters5/16/09). (The U.S. government says it does not know how many people it killed that day.)

Other deadlier days in Afghanistan include July 6, 2008, when U.S. bombing killed 47 civilians, including 39 women and children, attending a wedding in Nangarhar province (Guardian7/11/08); August 22, 2008, when a U.S. airstrike killed at least 90 civilians, including 60 children, in the village of Azizabad (UN News Centre,8/26/08); and July 23, 2010, when the U.S. killed 39 civilians in the village of Sangin (RTTNews8/5/10).

To be sure, many U.S. news reports, unlike those cited above, remembered to add “for Americans” to their descriptions of August 6 as the “deadliest day.” But there’s little evidence that anyone in U.S. media remembers the village of Granai.

(via )