jasmeet

semi-dashing colons;
tristanpej:

Man watches his wife and child leave as he’s awaiting deportation.

tristanpej:

Man watches his wife and child leave as he’s awaiting deportation.

jahanzebjz:

A map of American military bases in the region that surrounds Iran. Leaving aside the illegality of American presence in the region, let’s not be surprised that Iran wants to defend itself and probably is building a nuclear weapon to deter the US. One can imagine how the US will react if China had hundreds of bases in Canada and Mexico. Oh, wait, you won’t be able to imagine such a scenario because: 1) such a possibility is so many light years away that only an extremely brainwashed Westerner can think of it. 2) If such a scenario even remotely became possible, the US will nuke the entire planet in a blink of any eye, thus giving you no time to even think about such a possibility.

jahanzebjz:

A map of American military bases in the region that surrounds Iran. Leaving aside the illegality of American presence in the region, let’s not be surprised that Iran wants to defend itself and probably is building a nuclear weapon to deter the US. One can imagine how the US will react if China had hundreds of bases in Canada and Mexico. Oh, wait, you won’t be able to imagine such a scenario because: 1) such a possibility is so many light years away that only an extremely brainwashed Westerner can think of it. 2) If such a scenario even remotely became possible, the US will nuke the entire planet in a blink of any eye, thus giving you no time to even think about such a possibility.

'Deadliest Day' in Afghanistan? Not by a Long Shot

waristerrorism:

08/09/2011 by Jim Naureckas

August 6, 2011, when 38 soldiers, including 30 U.S. troops, were killed when their helicopter was shot down, was the “deadliest day” of the Afghan War, several media outlets told us:

  • David Muir (ABC World News Saturday, 8/6/11): “It was the deadliest day of the war in Afghanistan, 30 Americans, 22 Navy SEALs lost.”
  • David Gregory (NBC Meet the Press8/7/11): “This was the single deadliest day of the war.”
  • Chicago Tribune headline (8/7/11): “Taliban Says It Downed Copter in Deadliest Day of War inAfghanistan”
  • ABC This Week graphic (8/7/11): “DEADLIEST DAY IN AFGHANISTAN”
  • Terrell Brown, CBS Morning News (8/8/11): “America mourns the loss of 30 warriors killed in Afghanistanon the war’s deadliest day.”
  • AP (8/9/11): “Troops killed in the deadliest day of the Afghan War are coming home today.”

But, of course, it wasn’t the war’s deadliest day—that unhappy distinction goes to May 4, 2009, when the U.S. military attacked the village of Granai, killing 140 people, 93 of them children, according to an Afghan government investigation (Reuters5/16/09). (The U.S. government says it does not know how many people it killed that day.)

Other deadlier days in Afghanistan include July 6, 2008, when U.S. bombing killed 47 civilians, including 39 women and children, attending a wedding in Nangarhar province (Guardian7/11/08); August 22, 2008, when a U.S. airstrike killed at least 90 civilians, including 60 children, in the village of Azizabad (UN News Centre,8/26/08); and July 23, 2010, when the U.S. killed 39 civilians in the village of Sangin (RTTNews8/5/10).

To be sure, many U.S. news reports, unlike those cited above, remembered to add “for Americans” to their descriptions of August 6 as the “deadliest day.” But there’s little evidence that anyone in U.S. media remembers the village of Granai.