thepoliticalnotebook:

“As I’m talking to you now, they’re dying.” Injured Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy gives Sky News an interview from his hospital bed. This is a really important interview. His descriptions of what’s happening in Homs are painful and terrible. He spoke of the scheduled regularity of the shelling, beginning with horrible predictability at 6:00 every morning.

I’ve worked in many war zones. I’ve never seen, or been, in shelling like this. It is a systematic … I’m an ex-artillery gunner so I can kind of follow the patterns… they’re systematically moving through neighborhoods with munitions that are used for battlefields. This is used in a couple of square kilometers. 

He described the state of fear in Homs, calling it “beyond shell shock,” and the actions of Assad’s forces “absolutely indiscriminate,” with the intensity of the bombardments increasing daily. Conroy’s detailing of the inhumane conditions and the position of the Syrian citizens and the Free Syrian Army is important, because we don’t have as many journalists who have been able to tell us what it was like to be there as we have had elsewhere. He tells us that “The time for talking is actually over. Now, the massacre and the killing is at full tilt.” 

I actually want to quote his entire interview about the people who are living without hope, food, or power and his conviction that we will look back on this massacre with incredible shame if we stand by and do nothing. In lieu of that, you must must must watch every bit of this interview.

"Forget geopolitics," "do something."

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This is the photograph for which Rémi Ochlik, the 28-year-old French photojournalist killed in Homs this morning, won first prize in the general news category of this year’s World Press Photo awards. Taken in Ras Lanuf, Libya, it shows a revolutionary fighter resting in front of the flag.

thepoliticalnotebook:

A young photographer, Rémi Ochlik, a Sunday Times journalist, Marie Colvin, and a Syrian citizen journalist, Rami al-Sayed, have been killed in shelling in the city of Homs, Syria, today. A witness told Reuters that a shell hit the house in which Ochlik and Colvin were staying in the city’s Bab Amro district. Al-Sayed was killed in the same shelling.
Ochlik was a young photojournalist, but had covered an incredible amount of the revolutions of the past year, photographing Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and finally Syria. Colvin, an American, was a respected veteran journalist, who has been in the business for decades. She was noted for her reporting for Sri Lanka, where she was injured and since had worn an eyepatch. Just yesterday she reported in a video for the BBC, in which she discussed the horrors of what she was seeing. Al-Sayed was a noted citizen journalist who ran a live stream of the Homs bombardment relied upon by mainstream media outlets. Read activist Shakeeb al-Jabri’s tribute to him.
Photo of Marie Colvin via Getty Images. Photo of Rémi Ochlik via IP3 Press. Photo of Al-Sayed and his daughter Maryam from @NMSyria.
[Huffington Post; Le Monde; Reuters; NPR; Lede Blog]

This is heartbreaking and unfortunate. What comes to mind now is, knowing the three faces and the history of these people that have died needlessly, will we start caring about Syria? The UN estimates, estimates, over 5,000 people have died in Syria. Five thousand faces and stories just like this, gone unheard, unseen, unacknowledged. Let us honor the courage of these brave people, and respect what they were trying to do by listening to the cries from Syria. The ones we can still reach. thepoliticalnotebook:

A young photographer, Rémi Ochlik, a Sunday Times journalist, Marie Colvin, and a Syrian citizen journalist, Rami al-Sayed, have been killed in shelling in the city of Homs, Syria, today. A witness told Reuters that a shell hit the house in which Ochlik and Colvin were staying in the city’s Bab Amro district. Al-Sayed was killed in the same shelling.
Ochlik was a young photojournalist, but had covered an incredible amount of the revolutions of the past year, photographing Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and finally Syria. Colvin, an American, was a respected veteran journalist, who has been in the business for decades. She was noted for her reporting for Sri Lanka, where she was injured and since had worn an eyepatch. Just yesterday she reported in a video for the BBC, in which she discussed the horrors of what she was seeing. Al-Sayed was a noted citizen journalist who ran a live stream of the Homs bombardment relied upon by mainstream media outlets. Read activist Shakeeb al-Jabri’s tribute to him.
Photo of Marie Colvin via Getty Images. Photo of Rémi Ochlik via IP3 Press. Photo of Al-Sayed and his daughter Maryam from @NMSyria.
[Huffington Post; Le Monde; Reuters; NPR; Lede Blog]

This is heartbreaking and unfortunate. What comes to mind now is, knowing the three faces and the history of these people that have died needlessly, will we start caring about Syria? The UN estimates, estimates, over 5,000 people have died in Syria. Five thousand faces and stories just like this, gone unheard, unseen, unacknowledged. Let us honor the courage of these brave people, and respect what they were trying to do by listening to the cries from Syria. The ones we can still reach. thepoliticalnotebook:

A young photographer, Rémi Ochlik, a Sunday Times journalist, Marie Colvin, and a Syrian citizen journalist, Rami al-Sayed, have been killed in shelling in the city of Homs, Syria, today. A witness told Reuters that a shell hit the house in which Ochlik and Colvin were staying in the city’s Bab Amro district. Al-Sayed was killed in the same shelling.
Ochlik was a young photojournalist, but had covered an incredible amount of the revolutions of the past year, photographing Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and finally Syria. Colvin, an American, was a respected veteran journalist, who has been in the business for decades. She was noted for her reporting for Sri Lanka, where she was injured and since had worn an eyepatch. Just yesterday she reported in a video for the BBC, in which she discussed the horrors of what she was seeing. Al-Sayed was a noted citizen journalist who ran a live stream of the Homs bombardment relied upon by mainstream media outlets. Read activist Shakeeb al-Jabri’s tribute to him.
Photo of Marie Colvin via Getty Images. Photo of Rémi Ochlik via IP3 Press. Photo of Al-Sayed and his daughter Maryam from @NMSyria.
[Huffington Post; Le Monde; Reuters; NPR; Lede Blog]

This is heartbreaking and unfortunate. What comes to mind now is, knowing the three faces and the history of these people that have died needlessly, will we start caring about Syria? The UN estimates, estimates, over 5,000 people have died in Syria. Five thousand faces and stories just like this, gone unheard, unseen, unacknowledged. Let us honor the courage of these brave people, and respect what they were trying to do by listening to the cries from Syria. The ones we can still reach.

thepoliticalnotebook:

A young photographer, Rémi Ochlik, a Sunday Times journalist, Marie Colvin, and a Syrian citizen journalist, Rami al-Sayed, have been killed in shelling in the city of Homs, Syria, today. A witness told Reuters that a shell hit the house in which Ochlik and Colvin were staying in the city’s Bab Amro district. Al-Sayed was killed in the same shelling.

Ochlik was a young photojournalist, but had covered an incredible amount of the revolutions of the past year, photographing Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and finally Syria. Colvin, an American, was a respected veteran journalist, who has been in the business for decades. She was noted for her reporting for Sri Lanka, where she was injured and since had worn an eyepatch. Just yesterday she reported in a video for the BBC, in which she discussed the horrors of what she was seeing. Al-Sayed was a noted citizen journalist who ran a live stream of the Homs bombardment relied upon by mainstream media outlets. Read activist Shakeeb al-Jabri’s tribute to him.

Photo of Marie Colvin via Getty Images. Photo of Rémi Ochlik via IP3 Press. Photo of Al-Sayed and his daughter Maryam from @NMSyria.

[Huffington Post; Le Monde; Reuters; NPR; Lede Blog]

This is heartbreaking and unfortunate. What comes to mind now is, knowing the three faces and the history of these people that have died needlessly, will we start caring about Syria? The UN estimates, estimates, over 5,000 people have died in Syria. Five thousand faces and stories just like this, gone unheard, unseen, unacknowledged. Let us honor the courage of these brave people, and respect what they were trying to do by listening to the cries from Syria. The ones we can still reach.

mohandasgandhi:

WARNING: EXTREMELY GRAPHIC: Syrian boy with his jaw blown off

Few videos could highlight the tenuous situation in Syria as one published Sunday afternoon showing a boy with his jaw completely blown off.

The video also contains other children with their limbs removed during Syrian President Bashar Assad’s violent crackdown on dissent.

The condition of the boy is unclear at the time of this post.

H/T: bbcity

This is what Russia and China vetoed. This is what the world is staying silent over.

popmuslim:

Anderson Cooper talks to a Syrian activist who says the government is shelling Homs and more than 200 have been killed.

It’s like they are killing animals, these are human beings. They’ve been stabbing kids they’ve been stabbing women, raping women and no one is doing anything about this. This isn’t a game here; this is a reality this is actually going on. All these footage we’ve been seeing on YouTube of all these women being raped, people being burnt that’s all real, this is not a game this is actually going on. And there’s much more that’s going on that we don’t know about yet, the government is hiding so much more, we don’t know how much is going on here.

theamericanbear:

charquaouia:

This is after at least 100 were reported killed yesterday. Syrian activists are reporting numbers in the 360s within the last two days alone. 

Good thing they signed that peace deal with the Arab League. Wonder when that starts.

“The Syrian community’s mobilisation in Spain is just another sign that the movement that started in Tunisia has become global and affects citizens as a whole. Citizens continue to lose their fear and question official discourses, both within their own countries and abroad.”