Come Desdemona
Othello the tragedies
Shakespearean sorrows
Where do I begin? Where do we begin? // I got L’s on my record, weed on the vinyl, keys open doors when them keys is albino. Now knock on my door when my stars is a Lionel. (I’ve been fishing for a minute for a minnow.) Only I know that a pawn is a trade and a rookie for a castle like tuition for a final—playing hooky for a tassel—spend a minute on the minor. 

Let me be clear where I do not offer my body, where we as women do not offer our bodies: as sexual sacrifice. To men. To men of color. To African or Afro-Diasporan men to “feel better” from the horrors of colonization. We—women and men—have endured them together, and we fight them together, but we women will not be your soft landings, your buffer zones, your intimate tissues where you reach into us and let us absorb the tears you are too cowardly or discouraged or numb to shed. Grieve, dammit! We cannot win against colonization if you are constantly betraying us and our movements by accepting the blood money of patriarchal entitlement to our bodies.

Our bodies are not soft couches for you to lounge on but hard desk chairs for you to learn from: learn the lessons from our bodies. Women know how to grieve. Women know how to hold each other in sorrow. Men need to learn these lessons—how to turn to each other in sorrow, how to reveal their broken, brown hearts to each other—or you will keep turning to us, to our women’s bodies, with a glint in your eye, a groping arm in your sleeve, your too-close breath smelling of the colonizer’s rotting humanity. Stop betraying us, yourselves, our movements, and our people with your misogyny and cowardice. Heal.

— Aya de Leon, “In Praise of Shailja Patel and Calling Out Sexual Predators in Our Movements”  (via thepeacefulterrorist)

(via thepeacefulterrorist)

“It is something of a truism for psychoanalysis that one member of a family can carry the unconscious secrets of a whole family, can fall sick, as it were, on their behalf. My question is: for whom or what in 1950s and early 1960s America was Marilyn Monroe carrying the can? This is not, I should stress, the same as asking: what or even who killed her? Or: did she commit suicide? These are questions that I see as a diversion and to which in any case I strongly believe we can offer no definitive reply. I am interested, rather, in what she, unknowingly, but also crucially for my argument knowingly, is enacting on behalf of postwar America.”
owning-my-truth:

dee-dubble-yoo:

owning-my-truth:

More than 4,000 Africans have died from Ebola and the crisis is continuing to escalate, grow and spiral out of control, displacing tens of thousands, killing entire families and instilling fear into the day to day lives of millions of people in West Africa and all white people care about is their fucking chocolate. Fuck Bill Tomson (@BillTomson4 on Twitter), white liberals and Politico (@Politico on Twitter) for this disgusting, racist trash.

Ummm but y’all know most of that chocolate being produced along the Ivory Coast (which is where we get most of our chocolate)… The cocoa beans are farmed by slaves and children, right?
So not only is there a tragedy on top of tragedy for the people there… But it’s disgusting people are not mad that a painful death is striking down the children, as long as slaves can continue to harvest cocoa beans so they can have their blood chocolate.

Yes, darthnickles also provided a great resource documenting all of the child slave labor used in the cocoa industry. An excerpt from the article:

Some children end up on the cocoa farms because they need work and traffickers tell them that the job pays well. Other children are “sold” to traffickers or farm owners by their own relatives, who are unaware of the dangerous work environment and the lack of any provisions for an education. Often, traffickers abduct the young children from small villages in neighboring African countries, such as Burkina Faso and Mali,two of the poorest countries in the world. Once they have been taken to the cocoa farms, the children may not see their families for years, if ever.
Most of the children laboring on cocoa farms are between the ages of 12 and 16,but reporters have found children as young as 5. In addition, 40% of these children are girls, and some stay for a few months, while others end up working on the cocoa farms through adulthood.[…]
Approximately 1.8 million children in the Ivory Coast and Ghana may be exposed to the worst forms of child labor on cocoa farms.

This makes this Politico article all the more disgusting.
owning-my-truth:

dee-dubble-yoo:

owning-my-truth:

More than 4,000 Africans have died from Ebola and the crisis is continuing to escalate, grow and spiral out of control, displacing tens of thousands, killing entire families and instilling fear into the day to day lives of millions of people in West Africa and all white people care about is their fucking chocolate. Fuck Bill Tomson (@BillTomson4 on Twitter), white liberals and Politico (@Politico on Twitter) for this disgusting, racist trash.

Ummm but y’all know most of that chocolate being produced along the Ivory Coast (which is where we get most of our chocolate)… The cocoa beans are farmed by slaves and children, right?
So not only is there a tragedy on top of tragedy for the people there… But it’s disgusting people are not mad that a painful death is striking down the children, as long as slaves can continue to harvest cocoa beans so they can have their blood chocolate.

Yes, darthnickles also provided a great resource documenting all of the child slave labor used in the cocoa industry. An excerpt from the article:

Some children end up on the cocoa farms because they need work and traffickers tell them that the job pays well. Other children are “sold” to traffickers or farm owners by their own relatives, who are unaware of the dangerous work environment and the lack of any provisions for an education. Often, traffickers abduct the young children from small villages in neighboring African countries, such as Burkina Faso and Mali,two of the poorest countries in the world. Once they have been taken to the cocoa farms, the children may not see their families for years, if ever.
Most of the children laboring on cocoa farms are between the ages of 12 and 16,but reporters have found children as young as 5. In addition, 40% of these children are girls, and some stay for a few months, while others end up working on the cocoa farms through adulthood.[…]
Approximately 1.8 million children in the Ivory Coast and Ghana may be exposed to the worst forms of child labor on cocoa farms.

This makes this Politico article all the more disgusting.

owning-my-truth:

dee-dubble-yoo:

owning-my-truth:

More than 4,000 Africans have died from Ebola and the crisis is continuing to escalate, grow and spiral out of control, displacing tens of thousands, killing entire families and instilling fear into the day to day lives of millions of people in West Africa and all white people care about is their fucking chocolate. Fuck Bill Tomson (@BillTomson4 on Twitter), white liberals and Politico (@Politico on Twitter) for this disgusting, racist trash.

Ummm but y’all know most of that chocolate being produced along the Ivory Coast (which is where we get most of our chocolate)… The cocoa beans are farmed by slaves and children, right?

So not only is there a tragedy on top of tragedy for the people there… But it’s disgusting people are not mad that a painful death is striking down the children, as long as slaves can continue to harvest cocoa beans so they can have their blood chocolate.

Yes, darthnickles also provided a great resource documenting all of the child slave labor used in the cocoa industry. An excerpt from the article:

Some children end up on the cocoa farms because they need work and traffickers tell them that the job pays well. Other children are “sold” to traffickers or farm owners by their own relatives, who are unaware of the dangerous work environment and the lack of any provisions for an education. Often, traffickers abduct the young children from small villages in neighboring African countries, such as Burkina Faso and Mali,two of the poorest countries in the world. Once they have been taken to the cocoa farms, the children may not see their families for years, if ever.

Most of the children laboring on cocoa farms are between the ages of 12 and 16,but reporters have found children as young as 5. In addition, 40% of these children are girls, and some stay for a few months, while others end up working on the cocoa farms through adulthood.[…]

Approximately 1.8 million children in the Ivory Coast and Ghana may be exposed to the worst forms of child labor on cocoa farms.

This makes this Politico article all the more disgusting.

(via thepeacefulterrorist)

i have this v strong and strange and spontaneous desire to model 

asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.






asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson
Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?







“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.

asylum-art:

Anatomical Quilling: Paper Cross Sections of the Body by Lisa Nilsson

Artistic renderings of the internal body, from anatomy books to fine art, are often poorly communicated versions of real-life. These paper creations by Lisa Nilsson, however, create the perfect balance of aesthetically pleasing detail and scientific accuracy… even though they’re completely made with strips of paper. Created using the paper-crafting technique of quilling, originally used by Renaissance monks and nuns to make artistic use of the worn out gilded edges of Bibles, Nilsson has curled and twirled some remarkably detailed and tiny pieces. Why does paper make these pieces so enjoyably perfect?

“I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.”

“Densely squished” is a very accurate term, as her pieces are often only a few inches across. The close-up images shown here do a good job showing the impressive level of attention she pays to each internal shape, appearing much larger than the real-life pieces. Viewed from a distance, the pieces loose their strictly paper based form and look nearly photographed or drawn. You can see more of Nilsson’s creations, including paintings with just as much attention to detail, at lisanilssonart.com.

(via cinefamily)

denidoingstuff:

dynastylnoire:

commiekinkshamer:

GoFundMe to raise money for her funeral costs

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

And dudes fucking wonder why woman just stand there looking terrified or try ease out of a situation instead of asserting ourselves and saying no. A dude can laugh in the face of a lady he doesn’t want, we give a respectful no and we can get fucking shot. And they say street harassment is harmless and we should be flattered.

(via descentintotyranny)

thenewwomensmovement:

arielleishamming:

LGBT Rape Culture

This is important.
thenewwomensmovement:

arielleishamming:

LGBT Rape Culture

This is important.
thenewwomensmovement:

arielleishamming:

LGBT Rape Culture

This is important.
thenewwomensmovement:

arielleishamming:

LGBT Rape Culture

This is important.
thenewwomensmovement:

arielleishamming:

LGBT Rape Culture

This is important.
thenewwomensmovement:

arielleishamming:

LGBT Rape Culture

This is important.
“The School Board has a responsibility to oppose the systematic racism toward Indigenous people in the United States, which perpetuates high rates of poverty and income inequality, exacerbating disproportionate health, education and social crises.”
“I knew when I said
I love you
that I was inventing a new alphabet
for a city where no one could read
that I was saying my poems
in an empty theater
and pouring my wine
for those who could not
taste it.”
— Nizar Qabbani (1957)

(via 5000letters)

“It’s dark.
You exhale a fist of memory.
I love you like weathering wood
in a room of empty pianos.

When you return to something you love,
it’s already beyond repair.
You wear it broken.”
— James L. White, from “Lying in Sadness” in The Salt Ecstasies (via proustitute)

(via 5000letters)

I would say this to my mom all the time lmfao I would say this to my mom all the time lmfao

I would say this to my mom all the time lmfao

hazelcills:

"Why Art Is Always Emotional" by Wayne Koestenbaum

s c r e a m i n g

(via arabellesicardi)